By Helen Fulton

This Companion bargains a chronological sweep of the canon of Arthurian literature - from its earliest beginnings to the modern manifestations of Arthur present in movie and digital media. a part of the preferred sequence, Blackwell partners to Literature and tradition, this expansive quantity allows a primary realizing of Arthurian literature and explores why it's nonetheless indispensable to modern tradition.

  • Offers a complete survey from the earliest to the latest works
  • Features a powerful variety of recognized overseas participants
  • Examines modern additions to the Arthurian canon, together with movie and desktop video games
  • Underscores an realizing of Arthurian literature as primary to western literary culture

Content:
Chapter 1 the tip of Roman Britain and the arriving of the Saxons: An Archaeological Context for Arthur? (pages 13–29): Alan Lane
Chapter 2 Early Latin resources: Fragments of a Pseudo?Historical Arthur (pages 30–43): N. J. Higham
Chapter three heritage and fable: Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae (pages 44–57): Helen Fulton
Chapter four The Chronicle culture (pages 58–69): Lister M. Matheson
Chapter five The old Context: Wales and England 800–1200 (pages 71–83): Karen Jankulak and Jonathan M. Wooding
Chapter 6 Arthur and Merlin in Early Welsh Literature: fable and Magic Naturalism (pages 84–101): Helen Fulton
Chapter 7 The Arthurian Legend in Scotland and Cornwall (pages 102–116): Juliette Wood
Chapter eight Arthur and the Irish (pages 117–127): Joseph Falaky Nagy
Chapter nine Migrating Narratives: Peredur, Owain, and Geraint (pages 128–141): Ceridwen Lloyd?Morgan
Chapter 10 The “Matter of england” at the Continent and the Legend of Tristan and Iseult in France, Italy, and Spain (pages 143–159): Joan Tasker Grimbert
Chapter eleven Chretien de Troyes and the discovery of Arthurian Courtly Fiction (pages 160–174): Roberta L. Krueger
Chapter 12 The attract of Otherworlds: The Arthurian Romances in Germany (pages 175–188): Will Hasty
Chapter thirteen Scandinavian models of Arthurian Romance (pages 189–201): Geraldine Barnes
Chapter 14 The Grail and French Arthurian Romance (pages 202–217): Edward Donald Kennedy
Chapter 15 The English Brut culture (pages 219–234): Julia Marvin
Chapter sixteen Arthurian Romance in English renowned culture: Sir Percyvell of Gales, Sir Cleges, and Sir Launfal (pages 235–251): advert Putter
Chapter 17 English Chivalry and Sir Gawain and the fairway Knight (pages 252–264): Carolyne Larrington
Chapter 18 Sir Gawain in center English Romance (pages 265–277): Roger Dalrymple
Chapter 19 The Medieval English Tristan (pages 278–293): Tony Davenport
Chapter 20 Malory's Morte Darthur and heritage (pages 295–311): Andrew Lynch
Chapter 21 Malory's Lancelot and Guenevere (pages 312–325): Elizabeth Archibald
Chapter 22 Malory and the search for the Holy Grail (pages 326–339): Raluca L. Radulescu
Chapter 23 The Arthurian Legend within the 16th to Eighteenth Centuries (pages 340–354): Alan Lupack
Chapter 24 Scholarship and pop culture within the 19th Century (pages 355–367): David Matthews
Chapter 25 Arthur in Victorian Poetry (pages 368–380): Inga Bryden
Chapter 26 King Arthur in paintings (pages 381–399): Jeanne Fox?Friedman
Chapter 27 A Postmodern topic in Camelot: Mark Twain's (Re)Vision of Malory's Morte Darthur in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's court docket (pages 401–419): Robert Paul Lamb
Chapter 28 T. H. White's The as soon as and destiny King (pages 420–433): Andrew Hadfield
Chapter 29 Modernist Arthur: The Welsh Revival (pages 434–448): Geraint Evans
Chapter 30 historic Fiction and the Post?Imperial Arthur (pages 449–462): Tom Shippey
Chapter 31 Feminism and the myth culture: The Mists of Avalon (pages 463–477): Jan Shaw
Chapter 32 Remediating Arthur (pages 479–495): Professor Laurie A. Finke and Professor Martin B. Shichtman
Chapter 33 Arthur's American around desk: The Hollywood culture (pages 496–510): Susan Aronstein
Chapter 34 The paintings of Arthurian Cinema (pages 511–524): Lesley Coote
Chapter 35 electronic Divagations in a Hyperreal Camelot: Antoine Fuqua's King Arthur (pages 525–542): Nickolas Haydock

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Faulkner, N. (2000). The decline and fall of Roman Britain. Stroud: Tempus. Faulkner, N. (2002). The debate about the end: A review of evidence and methods. Archaeological Journal, 159, 59–76. Faulkner, N. (2004). The case for the Dark Ages. In R. Collins & J. Gerrard (eds), Debating late antiquity in Britain AD 300–700. Oxford: British Archaeological Reports, pp. 5–12. Frere, S. S. (1987). Britannia: A history of Roman Britain, 3rd edn. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul. Fulford, M. (2002). Wroxeter: Legionary fortress, baths, and the “great rebuilding” of c.

S. (1989). The ending of Roman Britain. London: B. T. Batsford. Faulkner, N. (2000). The decline and fall of Roman Britain. Stroud: Tempus. Faulkner, N. (2002). The debate about the end: A review of evidence and methods. Archaeological Journal, 159, 59–76. Faulkner, N. (2004). The case for the Dark Ages. In R. Collins & J. Gerrard (eds), Debating late antiquity in Britain AD 300–700. Oxford: British Archaeological Reports, pp. 5–12. Frere, S. S. (1987). Britannia: A history of Roman Britain, 3rd edn.

Thereafter, by implication, the ultimate triumph of the Britons was imminent, so Merfyn was being invited to take upon himself the role of national hero under divine protection. That he was sufficiently freckled to attract the by-name “Frych” may even mean that Merfyn’s hair was exceptionally red, in which case the red dragon becomes a metaphor for the king himself. Whether or not, this account of the “Loss of Britain” is a highly contemporary one, designed to position the king of the day as the ultimate savior of his people (Higham 2002).

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